Jane Austen, Juvenilia and Northanger Abbey

First, my apologies. I thought I’d already posted this. We’ll discuss the Juvenilia and other writings together, along with a few key pages of Northanger Abbey. We’ll read whatever we need to discuss on the spot, since I messed up the reading assignment.

https://jasna.org/austen/works/

https://jasna.org/austen/works/northanger-abbey/

Plan of a Novel:

(Q: 5 mins): Satire and Criticism? Use a passage from this “plan” to discuss JA not just as a novelist, or a parodist, but a critic of the 18th century novel and its conventions.

Parody=criticism of novel and conventions?  Interpretive exaggeration?  Capture of essential features of satiric object?

  1. Keywords: Vanity, wit, pride, duty, passion, duty, propriety, artless, genius, ?
  2. genre and sub-genre: Amatory fiction; sentimental fiction; satiric fiction; gothic fiction; radical fiction, ?
  3. Major themes:
  • Prescribed gender roles for both men and women, in courtship, marriage, and family-relations?
  • The relation between marriage, family, and property?
  • Religion and morality from the perspective of the (male or female) individual, or from that of the family and/or social order?
  • Theatricality, deception, disguise, or masquerade as a metaphor for social interactions and society at large?
  • Gendered sensibility and its accommodation within a (violent or antagonistic) social order?
  • Gendered taste and its accommodation within an (antagonistic) social order?

4. Some Early Parallels from Austen’s Juvenilia:

“Henry and Eliza” 

https://pemberley.com/janeinfo/henreliz.html

“Frederic and Elfrida”

https://pemberley.com/janeinfo/fredelfr.html

“The Beautifull Cassandra” and “A Letter from a Young Lady”

https://pemberley.com/janeinfo/juviscrp.html#lylwfbtsfhjlet

“Letter 5th of Love and Freindship”

https://pemberley.com/janeinfo/lovfrnd1.html#letter5

“Jack and Alice”

https://pemberley.com/janeinfo/jackalic.html

5. Northanger Abbey:

  • A. Free indirect Discourse: J Thorpe’s rudeness to sisters & C’s anger;
  • B. Books and Taste: ch. 6, reactions of Miss Andrews, Isabella, and J Thorpe to Udolpho; criticizing Udolpho but being a gothic novel too; 
  • C: Learning: Thorpe and balls; C’s realization of I’s cruelty and blaming of Tilney; boy craziness of I; J Thorpe’s echoing of Gen. Tilney; Henry scolds C for suspecting Gen.; Danielle, good nature or cowardice?

135-8: misunderstanding of riots in London:

From art to ruin to politics to silence:

“Something very shocking to come out in London”

“You speak with astonishing composure”

“The ladies stared” 

“The riot is only in your brain’ 

“A mob of three thousand men”

Real vs imagined monsters?

Feminine fears? Gender roles?

 

Q: Go to last 100 pp or so (chs. XX-XXXII) and identify a moment where Catherine, Henry, Eleanor, Gen. Tilney, Isabella or John Thorpe learn or provide a piece of information that advances the plot, clears up a mystery, or teaches Catherine something.

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Author: Dave Mazella

I am an Associate Professor of English at the University of Houston, Department of English, specializing in 18th-century British literature.

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